The tradition of applying digital face masks to riders in images ends with Disney

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Don’t you remember wearing a mask for the ride? Here’s why this is

Some companies will go to great lengths to ensure customers wear masks, even if the coverings aren’t real. Disney World has announced it is ending an experiment that saw masks added digitally to unmasked guests in on-ride photos.

In a statement (via WDW News Today), Disney said, “In response to guest requests, we tested modifying some ride photos. We are no longer doing this and continue to expect guests to wear face coverings except when actively eating or drinking while stationary.”

Walt Disney World theme parks implemented Covid-19 safety measures when they reopened in July, which includes guests wearing masks at all times apart from when eating, drinking while stationary, and swimming. To encourage people to use a covering on rides, anyone not wearing one wouldn’t receive their on-ride PhotoPass photos.

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A photo posted by Tony Townsend on the Facebook group Disney World Junkies showed how Disney started the unusual practice of adding masks digitally to those flouting the rules. In the photo (top), which is from the Dinosaur attraction, most people are wearing face coverings, but the woman at the back has had her mask added digitally.

In addition to Dinosaur, riders of Buzz Lightyear’s Space Ranger Spin also faced being digitally violated.

Disney likely introduced the practice so groups of mask-wearing riders could still get their photos even when rule-breakers shared the same car. One commentator notes that it appears the woman in question’s real mask is hanging from her ear so it could have just slipped off during the bumpy journey. Either way, Disney won’t be covering faces with MS Paint-style masks anymore.

Image credit: Tony Townsend on Facebook / VIAVAL TOURS

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